The Process of Grieving

Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried ... and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold.

 

Are There Really Stages to Grieving?

 

In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one.

 

The five stages of grief:

  • Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.”

  • Anger:Why is this happening? Who is to blame?”

  • Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.”

  • Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.”

  • Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.”

If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages – and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in.

Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.”

Grief can be like the waves of the ocean:

 

Grief is like standing in the ocean and feeling the waves come over you. In the beginning, it may seem like the harsh waves of a storm, being knocked off your feet or almost so. As time goes on, the waves may seem calmer but frequent. From time to time, you may still feel a big wave that knocks you to the side and causes you to feel as if the sand has been removed from under your feet.

 

For some they may take years to pass, and for others they will come unexpectedly and seemingly for no reason at all for many years. In time the waves should be less frequent, and may even go away all together until an event like a wedding or reunion occurs. Then the grief may rise up again.

 

More Resources:

 

Grief Share

Open to Hope

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